Getting Started with SAND CDBMS: Basic Steps
3. Connecting to the Database Instance

 

Once a database instance has been started with nserv, users must connect to the database instance using a client program in order to begin creating tables, loading data, and issuing queries. Follow the steps below to establish a connection using the SAND CDBMS Interactive SQL utility, nisqlm.

Notes:
To connect to the database instance using nisqlm from a remote computer on a network, a client-side nucleus.ini file must be configured: this must include at least a [CONNECTION...] section that matches the one in the server-side nucleus.ini file referred to by the connection-name parameter in the nserv invocation. For more information about the client-side nucleus.ini file, consult the SAND CDBMS Administration Guide.

To connect to the database instance using ODBC-enabled front-end software, including SAND Analytic Explorer, an ODBC data source definition (DSN) must be set up. For information about configuring an ODBC connection to a database instance, see the Nucleus ODBC Configuration Guides for UNIX and Windows clients.


Connecting to the Database Instance with nisqlm


Change to the database directory. Then invoke the nisqlm utility, using the following syntax:

nisqlm connection-name instance-name user-name[/user-password]

For this exercise, use the connection name and instance name specified when the instance was started with nserv, followed by the user name DBA (which, by default, has no password associated with it). Other user authorization IDs for the database can be created afterwards — consult the Setting Up the Logical Structure of the Database Using DDL Scripts section for more information.

For example:

/usr/sand/testdb> nisqlm test_alpha1 test DBA

-or-

X:\TESTDB> nisqlm test_alpha1 test DBA

A screen like the following will appear:

SAND CDBMS
Interactive SQL - Release 5
Copyright (c) 1987-2006 SAND Technology Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

SESSION 1: test_alpha1@test
SQL:1>

The appearance of the SQL:n> prompt indicates that the user can issue SAND CDBMS SQL commands to the database. 


Next step:

Run the scripts to create the tables for the sample database.

Consult the Setting Up the Logical Structure of the Database Using DDL Scripts section before starting to set up the logical structure of your own database.